All Stories   |  Hoodline Stories

Sanders pitches a tougher line than Trump on GM closures

PITTSBURGH (AP) - Sen. Bernie Sanders on Sunday accused President Donald Trump of betraying the working people who put him in office and challenged him to deny federal contracts to General Motors until the company reopens shuttered plants. "The biggest lie was that he was going to stand up for working families and take on the establishment," the Democratic presidential contender told a Pittsburgh rally in his first visit of 2019 to the critical battleground state of Pennsylvania. "That was a monstrous lie." Earlier in Lordstown, Ohio, and again in Pittsburgh, Sanders pressed Trump to put action behind his words on GM plant closings. Trump has assailed the company for shutting its small-car factory in Lordstown, in a politically important state, complaining about the company's leadership and a local union leader while seldom mentioning the other U.S. factories that GM plans to close. That's not enough, Sanders said. His message to GM and other multinationals: "If you want a federal contract paid for by taxpayers, treat your workers with respect and dignity. No more paying your workers inadequate wages while you provide CEO's with multimillion-dollar parachutes, no more taking away health care benefits, no more denying workers the right to form a union. "And if you are not a good and responsible corporate citizen, do not think that you will get federal contracts." Several union organizers spoke before Sanders at the Pittsburgh rally, part of Sanders' four-day, five-state swing through states that are part of the Democratic strategy to rebuild the "blue wall" in 2020. Sanders attracted an estimated 4,500 on the warm, breezy late afternoon to a grassy plaza near the campuses of Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh. Democrats are putting a heavy emphasis on winning back three states Trump...

Ex-Steelers player calls Ben Roethlisberger ‘racist’ while team pleads for ‘CHILL’

The months-long turmoil surrounding the Steelers added another chapter Thursday, when former Pittsburgh running back Rashard Mendenhall called star quarterback Ben Roethlisberger "racist." Mendenhall then appeared to walk back that accusation, while a Steelers offensive lineman pleaded with former players to stop offering negative opinions on the team via social media. Mendenhall posted several tweets Wednesday night defending former Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown, who was benched for the team's season finale after getting into a confrontation with Roethlisberger and skipping practices and team meetings before being to the Oakland Raiders. Mendenhall argued that there was a racial component to the way Brown has been depicted as a "diva," "selfish" and a "quitter," and asked for "more compassion and examination" for "a guy who gave everything he had until he couldn't bring himself to do it, for even one more game." Several hours later, Mendenhall returned to Twitter and said, "Alright, I'll end the mystery . . . [Roethlisberger]'s racist and [Brown]'s black. He had to catch balls from a racist quarterback. Every honest player knows it, it's not a big deal. He was just supposed to take his lickings and move on, like a slave for real." A few hours after that, Mendenhall tweeted, "Clearly it's no fun, when EVERYONE's the accused. . . . Please allow the dialogue in sports to be equal. Why's it so easy to shoot at one player, but not the other? B's not racist. Just like AB's not a dirtbag." He added, "Let's be fair," in a hashtag. Mendenhall has yet to clarify his comments, but he appeared to be using a damaging accusation at Roethlisberger to help make his case that Brown was unfairly tagged with negative descriptions. It was possible, though, for some on Twitter to only see the first tweet, in which he called...

Los Piratas insisten en su método orgánico

Los Piratas de Pittsburgh se la jugaron cuando traspasaron a Gerrit Cole y Andrew McCutchen bajo el concepto de que los jugadores que recibieron a cambio y las fichas que ya tenían les permitirían no quedar a la deriva en la ultra competitiva División Central de la Liga Nacional. Sus resultados fueron prometedores. Lograron conseguir apenas su cuarta temporada con un balance favorable en los últimos 25 años, al terminar 82-79, gracias al acelerado desarrollo de una joven rotación de abridores, liderada por Jameson Taillon y Trevor Williams. Pero ello solo les alcanzó para quedar en el cuarto lugar de la división. Mientras que muchos de sus oponentes se reforzaron durante el invierno, Pittsburgh redobló en su apuesta a su propia camada. "Creo que un repunte de siete juegos el año pasado fue un significativo paso adelante, y estamos posicionados para otro paso adelante y entrar en esa categoría en la que podemos tener una buena oportunidad de ir a los playoffs", dijo el dueño Bob Nutting. Para llegar a esa zona, los Piratas precisan que el núcleo de la rotación de Taillon, Williams, Chris Archer - adquirido en la fecha límite de canjes el pasado verano - y Joe Musgrove repitan un sólido 2018, y que la ofensiva sea más potente con la dirección del nuevo coach de bateo Rick Eckstein. Si bien los Piratas quedaron décimos en promedio de bateo (.254) el año pasado, se hundieron en la cola de las mayores en carreras anotadas, jonrones y slugging. La vuelta del tercera base Jung Ho Kang - quien conectó 36 jonrones en 2015 y 2016 antes que su carrera se descarrillara por conducir ebrio en su natal Corea del Sur a fines de 2016 - debe ayudar. El primera base Josh Bell busca recuperar el nivel que le permitió disparar 26 jonrones en su campaña de novato en 2017, total que declinó a 12 la...

Protests held in Pittsburgh after cop cleared in shooting

PITTSBURGH (AP) - The family of an unarmed black teenager fatally shot by a white police officer is expressing anger and sadness over a jury's decision to acquit, and Pittsburgh braced for protests a day after the verdict. Former East Pittsburgh Police Officer Michael Rosfeld was charged with homicide for shooting Antwon Rose II in the back as the 17-year-old ran away from a high-stakes traffic stop last June. But Rosfeld walked out of the courtroom a free man Friday after jurors rejected the prosecution's argument that he acted as Rose's "judge, jury and executioner," in the words of an assistant district attorney. "I hope that man never sleeps at night," Rose's mother, Michelle Kenney, said of Rosfeld, according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. "I hope he gets as much sleep as I do, which is none." The verdict leaves Rose's family to pursue the federal civil rights lawsuit they filed last August against Rosfeld and East Pittsburgh, a small municipality about 10 miles (16 kilometers) from downtown Pittsburgh. Rose's death - one of many high-profile killings of black men and teens by white police officers in recent years - spurred angry protests in the Pittsburgh area last year, including a late-night march that shut down a major highway. The reaction was measured after Friday night's verdict, with a small group of chanting protesters briefly blocking intersections and entering hotels. Pittsburgh police tweeted the "peaceful demonstration" had resulted in rolling, temporary road closures. Rose was riding in an unlicensed taxi that had been involved in a drive-by shooting minutes earlier when Rosfeld pulled the car over and shot the 17-year-old in the back, arm and side of the face as he ran away. The former officer told jurors he thought Rose or another suspect had a gun pointed at him, insisting he fired his...

A new procedure may preserve fertility in kids with cancer after chemo or radiation

(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Kyle Orwig, University of Pittsburgh (THE CONVERSATION) Cancer in children was often a death sentence in decades past, but new therapies are saving lives. Many of these treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation, however, make children infertile. Now, new research is showing one strategy to preserve their fertility so that someday they can have their own biological children. Many childhood cancer survivors have remained beyond the reach of current assisted reproductive technologies because they are not able to produce mature sperm or eggs. Adult patients have the option to freeze eggs or sperm before treatment and use those samples in the future to achieve pregnancy using assisted reproductive technologies. Unfortunately, those options are not available to children who are not yet able to produce mature eggs or sperm. Now I and my colleagues in the Orwig lab at the Magee-Womens Research Institute of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Cancer have developed a next-generation reproductive technology by figuring out how to preserve fertility in pediatric cancer patients who might face infertility after chemotherapy or radiation. Pediatric cancer therapies About 40,000 kids undergo cancer treatments each year, and 80 percent of children will survive and can look forward to a full and productive life. The bad news is that treatment comes at a cost: About 30 percent of adult survivors of these childhood cancers discover that their lifesaving cancer treatment had an unintended side effect - infertility. Cancer survivors report that fertility is important to them, and while adoption or other family building options are available, those options are not...