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Police again step in as Texas lawmaker halts abortion bill

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) - A Texas sheriff's department said Thursday it had "security concerns" over social media posts targeting a Republican lawmaker, who has come under fire by some conservative activists after blocking a bill that could lead to a woman being charged with homicide if she has an abortion. It marks the second time this month that Texas law enforcement has taken protective measures involving Republican lawmakers, who in both cases have been blamed by frustrated groups for torpedoing divisive measures, first over guns and now abortion. Last week, House Speaker Dennis Bonnen said a gun-rights advocate went to his family residence over displeasure that lawmakers weren't seriously considering efforts to legalize carrying a handgun without a permit. State troopers met the man at the home of Bonnen, who said lawmakers and their families were being "incessantly harassed by fanatical gun rights activists." The latest episode involves Republican state Rep. Jeff Leach, who earlier this week refused to advance the anti-abortion bill in his committee. He said Thursday that local authorities were monitoring his house near Dallas but declined further comment, referring questions to authorities. "We have notified Representative Jeff Leach that we are currently looking into some security concerns related to him and are taking appropriate measures," Sgt. Nick Bristow of the Collin County sheriff's office said in a statement. He would not elaborate about what measures sheriff's deputies have taken or provide details about the nature of the posts. Leach, who chairs the House committee that held a public hearing on the measure, known as House Bill 896, said in a statement posted on Twitter that the bill would not advance. Prominent anti-abortion groups in Texas have also come out against the measure, including the Texas...

A Texas scientist was called foolish. Then he won the Nobel Prize.

AUSTIN, Texas - It was Christmas Eve 1994, and Jim Allison was testing his theory that T cells, a type of white blood cell that fights viral and bacterial infections, could help the immune system fight cancer. That week, he was covering for a postdoctoral aide on a European trip, who'd injected cancerous mice with an antibody to activate T cells to go after tumors. The results were stunning: all of those given the antibody became cancer-free, while the mice not provided with the antibody saw their tumors grow until they eventually died. Allison ran back the experiment. But this time, the cancer didn't respond. Allison grew frustrated. "I was being told, 'You're just foolish, this is never gonna work,' " he said in an interview with The Washington Post. "That was one that really pissed me off." But when he returned four days later to check on his furry subjects, the tumors in the mice injected with the antibody had totally disappeared. "I went, 'Wow,' " said Allison, 70. "That was a real turning point. I said, 'Okay, we're onto something here.' I never expected that to happen. I did have a notion that if we could figure that out, then we might have a shot at cancer." Almost a quarter-century later, after countless medical trials, doubt from his peers and uncertainty of whether a product based on his discovery would ever be available to the public, Allison was a co-recipient of the 2018 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for his work on how to use the body's immune system to combat cancer. To date, Ipilimumab, known as "Ipi," and other immuno-oncology drugs have treated nearly 1 million patients worldwide. Sipping on a light beer in a hotel restaurant overlooking downtown Austin, Allison reminisced about his road from small-town Texan who lost multiple family members to cancer to barrier-breaking doctor whose story...

D-e-l-e-t-r-e-o

El sábado se llevó a cabo la final de competencia Regional de Deletreo Scripps del 2019, donde Mia Cuevas del sexto grado de primaria resultó ganadora del primer lugar. Ella será la representante del área en la competencia nacional en Washington D.C. Mia, estudiante de la escuela Lamar Middle, estuvo dentro de los 65 estudiantes que compitieron en el evento organizado por Texas A&M International University. Después de 16 rondas, obtuvo el primer lugar al deletrear correctamente la palabra "feasible". En el 2018, Mia obtuvo el cuarto lugar en la final regional del Scripps. Ella es un claro ejemplo que el trabajo duro y la práctica dan buenos resultados. Mia dijo que estaba sorprendida de haber ganado y explicó que se interesó profundamente en la competencia de deletreo cuando estaba en cuarto grado. "Comencé a interesarme en las palabras y su significado, y cómo deletrearlas", dijo Mia. "Me atrajo debido a que comencé a escribir libros. Soy la autora de dos libros, me encanta la literatura, y es muy emocionante pararse en el escenario y deletrear palabras difíciles". También comentó que estaba orgullosa de haber ganado y le dio las gracias a sus padres, Eduardo y Anahí; sus entrenadores, Mary García, maestra de octavo grado en la escuela Lamar Middle, y Herlinda Y. Treviño, maestra de dislexia en la primaria Alma Pierce Elementary; sus mentores, Michelle Martínez, asistente directiva en la escuela primaria Alma Pierce Elementary, y Verónica Orduño, fundadora de Familias por el Apoyo y la Conciencia del Autismo. La madre de Mia, Anahí Cuevas, dijo, "Estoy muy feliz y soy una madre orgullosa. Le aconsejo a los padres inculcarles a sus hijos disciplina, amor por las artes, la lectura, a impulsar su imaginación y llevarlos a la...