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Rickard's RBI double in 11th lifts Rays past Orioles 6-5

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) - Joey Rickard drove in the winning run in the 11th inning with an RBI double, his fourth hit of the game, and the Baltimore Orioles beat the Tampa Bay Rays 6-5 on Thursday night. Rickard doubled off Diego Castillo (0-1) after two-out singles by Chris Davis and Rio Ruiz kept the inning alive for Baltimore. John Means (2-2) got the win with two innings of relief for the Orioles, who snapped a six-game losing streak against Tampa Bay. Trey Mancini had three hits and Pedro Severino homered for the Orioles. Tommy Pham had four hits, included his third home run of the season for the Rays, but was picked off while trying to steal third base with the score tied in the ninth after Avisaíl Garcia homered off Mychal Givens. The Rays lost for just the second time in their last 10 games. Austin Meadows led off the first for Tampa Bay with a double off the top of the center-field wall off Baltimore starter Andrew Cashner. Meadows scored on Pham's single to put the Rays up 1-0. Mancini, Dwight Smith Jr., Renato Nunez and Rickard had hits in the third to give the Orioles a 2-1 lead off Jalen Beeks. Rays opener Hunter Wood gave up two hits in two shutout innings before giving way to Beeks. Pham's homer in the third off Cashner tied it for the Rays, but the Orioles went out in front against on Severino's blast off Beeks to lead off the fourth. Rickard led off the seventh with a triple and scored on a single by Richie Martin to put Baltimore up 4-2. Smith's sacrifice fly in the eighth made it 5-2. But the Rays stormed back to tie it. Mike Zunino's two-run double cut Baltimore's lead to 5-4 after a couple of walks in the eighth. Garcia tied it with a long home run off Mychal Givens in the ninth. Cashner gave up two runs on five hits in five innings while...

Perspective | ‘Yes, yes, yes’: Before he became a Boston Marathon champion, he was a boy learning about sports and his own abilities in Maryland

Gwena and Gerry Herman were driving along Interstate 95 when they learned of the win. The boy who had joined their Baltimore athletic program at 2 years old and who had trained with it through high school had won the men's wheelchair race at the Boston Marathon. Not only had Daniel Romanchuk taken first place, the 20-year-old had become the youngest person ever and the first American in 26 years to do so. "Yes, yes, yes," Gwena Herman posted on her Facebook page. "So so happy for him!!!" Then 10 minutes later: "So so exciting. Daniel is one of the hardest working athletes we have ever had come out of the program!!" Then three minutes later: "No sprint to the finish this time. Total domination!" The Boston Marathon is known for showcasing the human body's potential and in that sense, Romanchuk's victory was no different. It showed an athlete at the top of his game. His 1 hour, 21 minutes and 36 second finish was the culmination of years of training and discipline. But his win also showed something else. It showed the significance of a phrase he heard often while growing up and training in Maryland and which he has been known to reference in interviews: "Teach kids they can before someone tells them they can't." That is the motto of the Bennett Blazers, the adaptive sports program at the Kennedy Krieger Institute that Gwena and Gerry Herman started in 1989. The program, which is a chapter of Disabled Sports USA, has helped hundreds of children with physical disabilities participate, and many times excel, in sports they might not have been able to try otherwise. "Often times, parents come to our program, and all they've been getting is negative news," Gerry Herman told me. Those parents have been told mostly about what their children can't do. Herman said he gets to...

Glasnow wins 4th in a row, Rays beat Orioles 4-2

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) - Tyler Glasnow allowed two runs over seven innings in winning his fourth consecutive start to begin the season, Avisail Garcia drove in three runs, and the Tampa Bay Rays beat the Baltimore Orioles 4-2 on Tuesday night for their seventh victory in eight games. Glasnow (4-0) allowed hits to six of the first 13 batters he faced, but the 6-foot-8 right-hander allowed just one hit over his final 4 2/3 innings and ended the outing by retiring 10 in a row. Garcia hit a two-run homer during a three-run fourth, and added an RBI single in the eighth. Jose Alvarado and Diego Castillo, who earned his second save, each went a perfect inning. The Orioles got an RBI from both Rio Ruiz and Renato Nunez, and Dylan Bundy (0-2) gave up three runs and three hits over five innings. Baltimore first baseman Chris Davis was in the original lineup but was scratched due to illness. After Tommy Pham walked leading off the fourth, Ji-Man Choi doubled for the Rays' first hit. Yandy Diaz hit a sacrifice fly before Garcia homered to center off Bundy as Tampa Bay went up 3-2. Bundy, after giving up a major league-high 41 homers last season, has allowed seven in four starts this year. Ruiz ended Glasnow's 16-inning scoreless streak and put the Orioles up 1-0 with an RBI single in the first. Baltimore took a 2-0 lead on Nunez's run-scoring double in the third. He has driven in six runs during a seven-game hitting streak. TRAINER'S ROOM Orioles: RHP Alex Cobb (lumbar strain) had a simulated game and is scheduled to start Friday night against Minnesota. ... DH/OF Mark Trumbo (right knee surgery) has not resumed hitting. ... RHP Nate Karns (right forearm strain) will have his second bullpen session Wednesday. Rays: Ace Blake Snell went on the 10-day IL with a fractured...

Attacked newsroom: Pulitzer commemorated with somber silence

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - Capital Gazette staff members stayed silent and somberly exchanged hugs Monday when the Maryland newspaper won a special Pulitzer Prize citation for its coverage and courage in the face of a massacre in its newsroom. Before the announcement, newspaper employees gathered in their newsroom to remember the five staffers who were shot and killed last June in one of the deadliest attacks on journalists in U.S. history. "It's definitely bittersweet," said reporter Chase Cook. "Since it's so connected to something so tragic, there was no euphoric pop-off of excitement." The Capital Gazette, based in the Maryland state capital of Annapolis, published on schedule the day after the shooting attack. The man charged in the attack had a longstanding grudge against the newspaper. Capital Gazette editor Rick Hutzell said the paper had submitted entries in five categories, including a joint entry with The Baltimore Sun for breaking news. Although the Capital Gazette didn't win in any of the five categories, the Pulitzer board awarded the citation with an extraordinary $100,000 grant to further its journalism. The Pulitzer board said the citation honors the journalists, staff and editorial board of the newspaper "for their courageous response to the largest killing of journalists in U.S. history in their newsroom" and for an "unflagging commitment to covering the news and serving their community at a time of unspeakable grief." Hutzell said he thought the Pulitzer board handled its decision admirably. "Clearly, there were a lot of mixed feelings," Hutzell said. "No one wants to win an award for something that kills five of your friends." He also said the paper was aware it would be facing stiff competition. "It's very difficult when you are reporting in some...

Pulitzers honor coverage of 3 US mass shootings in 2018

NEW YORK (AP) - The South Florida Sun Sentinel and the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette won Pulitzer Prizes on Monday and were recognized along with the Capital Gazette of Maryland for their coverage of three horrifying mass shootings in 2018 at a high school, a synagogue and a newsroom itself. The Associated Press won in the international reporting category for documenting the humanitarian horrors of Yemen's civil war, while The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal were honored for delving into President Donald Trump's finances and breaking open the hush-money scandals involving two women who said they had affairs with him. The Florida paper received the Pulitzer in public service for its coverage of the massacre of 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland and for detailing the shortcomings in school discipline and security that contributed to the carnage. The Post-Gazette received the prize in the breaking news category for its reporting on the synagogue rampage that left 11 people dead. The man awaiting trial in the attack railed against Jews before, during and after the massacre, authorities said. After the Pulitzer announcement, the newsroom in Pittsburgh observed a moment of silence for the victims. At the Sun Sentinel, too, the staff took in the award in a sober spirit. "We're mindful of what it is that we won for," Editor-in-Chief Julie Anderson said. "There are still families grieving, so it's not joy, it's almost ... I don't know how to describe it. We're emotional, as well." So, too, at the Capital Gazette, which was given a special citation for its coverage and courage in the face of a massacre in its own newsroom. The Pulitzer board also gave the paper an extraordinary $100,000 grant to further its journalism. "Clearly, there were a...

Davis sets record at 0 for 49, including warning track shot

BALTIMORE (AP) - Chris Davis has tied the major league record for the longest hitless streak by a position player, going 0 for 46 during an unproductive run that began last year. Baltimore's highly paid first baseman was retired in his first two trips to the plate Monday night against Oakland, leaving him hitless in 25 at-bats this season. Combined with his 0-for-21 finish in 2018, Davis is tied with Los Angeles Dodgers infielder Eugenio Velez for the lengthiest run of futility by a non-pitcher, according to the Elias Sports Bureau. Velez went hitless in his final nine at-bats of the 2010 season before going 0 for 37 in 2011 and eclipsed the previous longest hitless streak, shared by Pittsburgh's Bill Bergen (1909), Dave Campbell of San Diego and St. Louis (1973) and Milwaukee's Craig Counsell (earlier in 2011). This isn't the first dubious record owned by Davis. He batted .168 last year, the worst batting average in major league history for a qualified player. Davis is in the fourth season of a $161 million, seven-year contract. The 33-year-old has two RBIs this season - on a bases-loaded walk and a forceout. He's struck out 13 times. On Monday, he lined out to right field in the second inning against Marco Estrada and matched the record hitless streak in the third with an opposite-field fly to left. Before the record-tying out, Davis got a second chance when second baseman Jurickson Profar dropped his foul pop to right. Manager Brandon Hyde was asked before Monday's game whether he considered resting Davis rather than insert him in the lineup against Estrada. "He really wanted to play today," Hyde said. Davis entered hitting .167 (6 for 36) with three homers against Estrada. Hyde has done his best to be patient with Davis. "I was hoping he'd get off to a good...

The Latest: General Assembly ends with tribute to speaker

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - The Latest on the last day of the Maryland General Assembly's legislative session (all times local): 6 p.m. The University of Maryland Medical System's board of directors would face an overhaul under legislation approved by state lawmakers after officials learned that about a third of the board benefited financially through the hospital network's contracts. The Senate approved the bill unanimously Monday, sending it to Gov. Larry Hogan. The measure will require all board members to leave their positions and reapply to return. It also bars board members from getting contracts with the system without a competitive bidding process. The vote comes as Baltimore's City Council on Monday called on Mayor Catherine Pugh to resign. Multiple investigations are probing lucrative deals she negotiated over years to self-published children's books to customers that included a hospital network she once helped oversee. ___ 2:30 p.m. Maryland lawmakers are considering how to decide on a new House speaker, after longtime Speaker Michael Busch died over the weekend. The House Democratic Caucus met with Attorney General Brian Frosh and Assistant Attorney General Sandra Brantley on Monday to discuss options. While the speakership is vacant, House Speaker Pro Tem Adrienne Jones assumes responsibilities. Frosh says options include electing a new speaker on Monday, electing a speaker between now and the beginning of next session or wait until next session in January. Del. Eric Luedtke, who chairs the House Democratic Caucus, noted the state went several months without a speaker in 1973. He says he believes a decision will be made "sooner than that," and that "we're just trying to figure out the details." ___ 11:53...

News of the Day From Across the Nation

1 Baltimore politics: The city council on Monday sent a letter to Mayor Catherine Pugh calling on her to resign as investigators probe lucrative deals she negotiated to sell her children's book series. Bernard Young is the city council president who has temporarily departed the panel to take over Pugh's day-to-day responsibilities. The mayor took an indefinite leave of absence, citing health reasons. In response to the council's letter, Pugh said she "fully intends" to return once her health improves. 2 Mother killed: A man shot and killed the mother of his 17-month-old child during a custody exchange in front of a Southern California police station and was arrested several hours later, authorities said. The child was not injured. The woman was approaching the front door of the Hawthorn Police Department Sunday evening to pick up the child when the father emerged from a parking lot with a shotgun and opened fire, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said in a statement. His identity and the names of the mother and child were not released. 3 Chicago violence: Two men who opened fire on a crowd of people gathered for a baby shower, wounding six people, including two children, may have acted in retaliation for an earlier gang conflict, police said. Authorities have only "shards of information" about what happened at the family gathering in Chicago because witnesses are not cooperating, a police spokesman said. At least a dozen people were gathered outside a home decorated with balloons for the baby shower when two armed men approached on foot and began shooting Saturday evening. The gunmen fired multiple rounds and fled. Three of the victims were hospitalized in critical condition. 4 Trump club: A Monday bond hearing was adjourned until next week...

Maryland House Speaker Busch dies, a Chesapeake Bay defender

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - Michael Busch, the longest-serving Maryland House speaker in the state's history, died Sunday, his chief of staff said. Busch was 72. Busch, a Democrat who became speaker in 2003, had developed pneumonia after a follow-up procedure to a 2017 liver transplant after being diagnosed with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, a liver disease. He also had heart bypass surgery in September, after experiencing shortness of breath. Chief of staff Alexandra Hughes said Busch was surrounded by loved ones at the time of death. He was known for his interest in health care, environmental measures to help the Chesapeake Bay and progressive polices. The state approved same-sex marriage and repealed the death penalty during his tenure as speaker. Legislation raising the state's minimum wage was passed twice during his time in office. Maryland Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, the longest-serving Senate president in the state's history, said Busch was a model state delegate who cared for every corner of the state. "My heart is broken for Mike Busch's family, the State of Maryland, and the Speaker's extended family - elected officials and staff that he has been a mentor and coach to over his time in public service," said Miller, a Democrat who has been battling prostate cancer. "Mike has been a friend for years, and has led the state to new heights of environmentalism and education." Gov. Larry Hogan, a Republican, said flags will fly at half-staff to honor Busch, effective immediately until sunset of the day of interment. He described Busch as "a giant in our government" and said his legacy is evident in his many legislative achievements. "Speaker Busch and I came from different sides of the aisle, but we often came together in the best interests of the people of Maryland," Hogan said. "He served with the...

'Healthy Holly', once lucrative, now bane of Baltimore mayor

BALTIMORE (AP) - "Healthy Holly" is a polite African American girl with devoted parents and a little brother. She loves exercise. She craves fresh fruit and vegetables. And she's now the bane of Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh's existence. Since the state prosecutor's office began a criminal investigation into Pugh at the Maryland governor's request earlier this week, there's been a growing tide of examinations spurred by revelations that she was paid $700,000 over roughly eight years for her self-published paperback series about the fictional "Healthy Holly." By Wednesday afternoon, the total grew to $800,000 after a businessman divulged that his financial firm gave Pugh $100,000 after she clinched the 2016 Democratic primary. The first-term mayor went on an indefinite leave of absence amid the accelerating scandal involving the lucrative sales of her obscure children's books to a $4 billion hospital network she once helped oversee and a major health plan that does business with the city. Al Redmer, Maryland's insurance commissioner, told The Associated Press on Wednesday that his regulatory agency is now looking at Kaiser Permanente, CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, and a state car insurance fund for possible wrongdoing. "To the extent that any insurance carrier would divert funds away from that mission is something that could be concerning based on the facts," Redmer said in an interview. "Our role is to make sure that entities that we regulate have in no way violated the law or regulations." Pressure on Pugh ratcheted up dramatically after the Kaiser Permanente disclosed Monday that it paid her limited liability company about $114,000 between 2015 and 2018 for roughly 20,000 copies of her illustrated books. The company said it "purchased Healthy Holly books because we believe residents would be inspired by a...