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CA Sacramento CA Zone Forecast

CA Sacramento CA Zone Forecast for Thursday, March 21, 2019 _____ 777 FPUS56 KSTO 212226 ZFPSTO Interior Northern California Zone Forecasts for California National Weather Service Sacramento CA 326 PM PDT Thu Mar 21 2019 Spot temperatures and probabilities of measurable precipitation are for tonight, Friday, Friday night, and Saturday. CAZ013-221200- Shasta Lake Area / Northern Shasta County- Including the city of Shasta Dam 326 PM PDT Thu Mar 21 2019 .TONIGHT...Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming mostly cloudy. A slight chance of rain showers. Lows 31 to 43 higher elevations...40 to 47 lower elevations. Prevailing southwest winds up to 10 mph in the evening becoming light. .FRIDAY...Rain at lower elevations...and rain and snow at higher elevations. Highs 37 to 52 higher elevations...49 to 54 lower elevations. No snow accumulation lower elevations...2 to 4 inches higher elevations. Snow level 4000 to 4500 feet. Prevailing southwest winds up to 15 mph with gusts to around 30 mph. .FRIDAY NIGHT...Rain at lower elevations...and rain and snow at higher elevations. Lows 30 to 42 higher elevations...39 to 45 lower elevations. No snow accumulation lower elevations...up to 3 inches higher elevations. Snow level 4000 to 4500 feet. Prevailing north winds up to 10 mph with gusts to around 25 mph. .SATURDAY...Mostly cloudy. A chance of rain and snow showers in the morning, then a chance of rain showers in the afternoon. Not as cool. Highs 40 to 55 higher elevations...53 to 58 lower elevations. No snow accumulation lower elevations...up to 1 inch higher elevations. Snow level 4500 feet. Light winds becoming south up to 10 mph...

The Latest: Man who slipped into California river found dead

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - The Latest on river dangers in California (all times local): 8:30 p.m. Authorities say search teams have found the body of a man who fell into a rain-swollen river in Northern California over the weekend. The Placer County Sheriff's Office says 23-year-old Andy Odon Ortega Fonseca was found dead Monday in the American River northeast of Sacramento. Investigators believe he was taking photographs along the bank when he slipped and fell Sunday evening. To the south, crews are searching for a 5-year-old girl who slipped into the Stanislaus River on Sunday afternoon at Knights Ferry in the Sierra Nevada foothills. Authorities are warning of dangers resulting from California's exceptionally wet winter. ___ 9:45 a.m. Authorities have rescued two people from a fast-flowing wash in Los Angeles and are searching a river in the Sierra Nevada foothills for a little girl swept away during the weekend, spotlighting the dangers of California's very wet winter. The Los Angeles Fire Department says a man and woman were pulled from Pacoima Wash around 12:30 a.m. Monday after being swept miles downstream at 20 mph. The department says the man was able to call 911 from the water, and rescuers lowered a firefighter in a harness to pluck them from the stream. In the Sierra foothills, the search goes on for a 5-year-old girl who slipped into the Stanislaus River on Sunday afternoon at Knights Ferry. Relatives and bystanders tried to reach the girl but she was swept away.

Public regularly denied access to police officer videos

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) - The video is brief but disturbing: An officer is seen striking an unarmed suspect with his handgun as the man falls into the grass. An autopsy would later show he died from a gunshot to the back of the head. After the death last July of 26-year-old Daniel Fuller in Devils Lake, North Dakota, investigators described the video to his grieving relatives. But for days, weeks and then months, they refused to release it to the family or the public. They did so only after a prosecutor announced in November that the officer did not intend to fire his gun and would not face criminal charges. "It took forever for them to release the video because they kept saying it was an ongoing investigation," said Fuller's older sister, Allyson Bartlett. "I don't think they wanted pressure from the community." Her experience is typical. An investigation by The Associated Press has found that police departments routinely withhold video taken by body-worn and dashboard-mounted cameras that show officer-involved shootings and other uses of force. They often do so by citing a broad exemption to state open records laws - claiming that releasing the video would undermine an ongoing investigation. During the last five years, taxpayers have spent hundreds of millions of dollars to outfit officers' uniforms and vehicles with cameras and to store the footage they record as evidence. Body cameras, in particular, have been touted as a way to increase police transparency by allowing for a neutral view of whether an officer's actions were justified. In reality, the videos can be withheld for months, years or even indefinitely, the AP review found. To be sure, some departments voluntarily release videos of high-profile incidents, sometimes within days or weeks. They also are forced to share them during civil rights lawsuits or...

California governor places moratorium on executions

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) - The 737 inmates on California's largest-in-the-nation death row are getting a reprieve from Gov. Gavin Newsom, who plans to sign an executive order Wednesday placing a moratorium on executions. Newsom also is withdrawing the lethal injection regulations that death penalty opponents already have tied up in courts and shuttering the new execution chamber at San Quentin State Prison that has never been used. "The intentional killing of another person is wrong and as governor, I will not oversee the execution of any individual," he said in prepared remarks. Newsom called the death penalty "a failure" that "has discriminated against defendants who are mentally ill, black and brown, or can't afford expensive legal representation." He also said innocent people have been wrongly convicted and sometimes put to death. California hasn't executed anyone since 2006, when Arnold Schwarzenegger was governor. And though voters in 2016 narrowly approved a ballot measure to speed up the punishment, no condemned inmate faced imminent execution. Since California's last execution, its death row population has grown to house one of every four condemned inmates in the United States. They include Scott Peterson, whose trial for killing his wife Laci riveted the country, and Richard Davis, who kidnapped 12-year-old Polly Klaas during a slumber party and strangled her. Newsom "is usurping the express will of California voters and substituting his personal preferences via this hasty and ill-considered moratorium on the death penalty," said Michele Hanisee, president of the Association of Deputy (Los Angeles County) District Attorneys. But Alison Parker, U.S. managing director at Human Rights Watch, praised Newsom's "great courage and leadership in ending the cruel, costly, and unfair practice of executing...