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CA Phoenix AZ Zone Forecast

CA Phoenix AZ Zone Forecast for Wednesday, April 17, 2019 _____ 651 FPUS55 KPSR 181002 ZFPPSR Zone Forecast Product for Southwest Arizona/Southeast California National Weather Service Phoenix AZ 301 AM MST Thu Apr 18 2019 This is an automatically generated product that provides average values for large geographical areas and may not be representative of the exact location that you are interested in. For a more site specific forecast, please visit weather.gov/phoenix and either (1) Select a location from the dropdown menu above the map or (2) Click a location on the map. You can refine your selection by clicking on the map displayed on the resulting page. AZZ537-540-542>544-546-548-550-551-182300- Northwest Valley-Buckeye/Avondale-Deer Valley-Central Phoenix- North Phoenix/Glendale-Scottsdale/Paradise Valley-East Valley- South Mountain/Ahwatukee-Southeast Valley/Queen Creek- Including the cities of Circle City, Surprise, Wittmann, Beardsley, Sun City West, Avondale, Cashion, Goodyear, Liberty, Peoria, Phoenix, Paradise Valley, Mesa, Chandler, Tempe, Gilbert, Sun Lakes, and Queen Creek 301 AM MST Thu Apr 18 2019 .TODAY...Sunny and much warmer. Highs 88 to 92. East wind 5 to 10 mph in the morning becoming west around 5 mph in the afternoon. .TONIGHT...Clear. Not as cool. Lows 59 to 65. Northwest wind around 5 mph in the evening becoming northeast 5 to 10 mph after midnight. .FRIDAY...Sunny and warmer. Highs 94 to 98. East wind 5 to 10 mph in the morning becoming southeast in the afternoon. .FRIDAY NIGHT...Mostly clear. Lows 62 to 69. Light wind in the evening becoming east around 5 mph after midnight. .SATURDAY...Mostly...

Arizona lawmakers OK ban on cellphone use while driving

PHOENIX (AP) - The small list of states that allow either texting while driving or hand-held cellphone use is shrinking after the Arizona House on Thursday overwhelmingly approved a cellphone use ban and sent it to Republican Gov. Doug Ducey for his expected signature. Arizona, Missouri and Montana had been the only three states that hadn't banned texting while driving. Arizona will join 16 others that bans all use of a hand-held cellphones while driving. The 44-16 vote on the toughest of three proposals debated by House lawmakers Thursday comes after years of inaction by the Republican-controlled Legislature. The Senate earlier approved it on a 20-9 vote. Ducey has pledged to sign the measure, which takes effect in January 2021. More than two dozen cities enacted local bans that will remain in effect until then. The House rejected a weaker ban on cellphone use, but approved legislation that strengthens the state's overarching distracted driving law on a 31-29 party line vote. Bills to restrict phone use while driving have been introduced for a decade but haven't advanced amid concerns by Republicans about creating a "nanny state" that overregulates behavior. Supporters of the ban pointed to the death of a police officer in January after a distracted driver lost control and struck him on a Phoenix-area freeway. Relatives of Salt River tribal police officer Clayton Townsend and others who have died in distracted driving crashes gave emotional testimony, carrying photos of their loved ones around the Capitol. The officer's death gave the proposal inertia that hadn't appeared despite tearful testimony in recent years by relatives of people killed in accidents caused by cellphone use, said Republican Sen. Kate Brophy McGee, who carried the measure with Rep. Noel...

A couple held a day laborer at gunpoint to act out a ‘sexual fantasy,’ then sent his wife photos, police say

It's a familiar scene in Phoenix, and all over the country: Early in the morning, day laborers congregate in the parking lot outside of a Home Depot, hoping to find work. Landscapers, contractors and construction crews stop by on their way to job sites and grab as many people as they need, offering them a flat fee or a meager hourly wage for a hard day's labor. The setup is rife with abuse, and the laborers, often immigrants with little knowledge of English, frequently find themselves on the losing end of exploitative arrangements. Wage theft is common, and workers have become targets for robbers because they are famously reluctant to report crimes to the police. And, as one day laborer from the Mexican state of Sonora learned last week, things can go very wrong after you jump into a stranger's truck. Phoenix police say a couple held the man at gunpoint, sexually assaulting him and then blackmailing him with photos. And they say it's not the first time the pair have done this. On April 8, the man was looking for work at a Home Depot on the west side of Phoenix when police said Brenda Acuna-Aguero, 39, picked him up, telling him that she and her husband needed help moving some items inside their home. Once they got to the woman's ordinary-looking ranch house, the situation quickly took a strange turn. The man, who The Washington Post is not naming because he is a victim of sexual assault, later told police that Acuna-Aguero had started to make sexual comments to him, telling him that "it was her fantasy to have sex with a laborer." Uncomfortable with the situation, he initially played along. Once he realized that she was serious about wanting to have sex with him, though, he told her straight out that it wasn't going to happen. Then, the woman's husband burst in the room, clutching a black rifle. Jorge...

Asylum seekers who show credible fear not eligible for bond

PHOENIX (AP) - Detained asylum seekers who have shown they have a credible fear of returning to their country will no longer be able to ask a judge to grant them bond. U.S. Attorney General William Barr decided Tuesday that asylum seekers who clear a "credible fear" interview and are facing removal don't have the right to be released on bond by an immigration court judge while their cases are pending. The attorney general has the authority to overturn prior rulings made by immigration courts, which fall under the Justice Department. It's Barr's first immigration-related decision since taking office. Typically, an asylum seeker who crosses between ports of entry would have the right to ask a judge to grant them bond for release. Under the new ruling, they will have to wait in detention until their case is adjudicated. "There will be many, many people who are not gonna even have the opportunity to apply for release now," said Gregory Chen, director of government relations for the American Immigration Lawyers Association. Chen said that about 90 percent of asylum seekers pass their credible fear interview, the first step in seeking asylum. The decision doesn't affect asylum-seeking families because they generally can't be held for longer than 20 days. It also doesn't apply to unaccompanied minors. Barr's ruling takes effect in 90 days and comes amid a frustrating time for the administration as the number of border crossers has skyrocketed. Most of them are families from Central America who are fleeing violence and poverty. Many seek asylum. There were a total of 161,000 asylum applications filed in the last fiscal year and 46,000 in the first quarter of 2019, according to the Executive Office for Immigration Review, which oversees immigration courts. Sarah Pierce,...

Arizona House spent $47,000 in 1st month of Stringer inquiry

PHOENIX (AP) - The Arizona House paid a law firm more than $47,000 for the first month of its investigation of former Rep. David Stringer, records show. Stringer resigned last month when confronted with a Baltimore police report showing he was accused of paying boys for sex in the 1980s. He's denied the allegations. The law firm Ballard Spahr billed $47,218 for its early work on the probe, according to an invoice dated March 12 and released to The Associated Press under Arizona's public records law. The record shows 12 lawyers worked on the investigation for about 122 hours and billed between $215 and $512 per hour during the first month. Stringer and his attorney, Carmen Chenal, did not respond to requests for comment. The House Ethics Committee hired the team led by Ballard Spahr attorney Joseph Kanefield to investigate after the panel received two ethics complaints against Stringer. Both cited a Phoenix New Times report that Stringer was charged with unspecified sex crimes in 1983. The charges were later expunged, and authorities in Maryland refused to release records. One complaint also cited Stringer's offensive remarks on race and immigration. Stringer fought hard to keep records related to his arrest and a later investigation by the District of Columbia bar from becoming public. House Speaker Rusty Bowers said Stringer resigned when he was told the House had received the long-buried police report. Investigative materials, including the police report, were released publicly two days later. The firm has not submitted its final invoice. The records released do not show how much the firm paid a private investigator to locate the 1983 police report. The report showed that a teenage boy told detectives he and another teen met Stringer in a park, went to his...

Arizona House votes to repeal HIV/AIDS instruction law

PHOENIX (AP) - The Latest on a move by Arizona lawmakers to repeal a law barring HIV education that "promotes a homosexual lifestyle." (all times local): 3:30 p.m. The Arizona House has approved the repeal of a 1991 law barring HIV and AIDS instruction that "promotes a homosexual lifestyle" following the filing of a lawsuit by LGBT groups. Wednesday's action sends the measure to the Senate and comes a day after Republican Attorney General Mark Brnovich declined to join in defending the suit filed last month against the state's Board of Education and schools chief. The 1991 law also prohibits HIV and AIDS instruction that "portrays homosexuality as a positive alternative lifestyle" or "suggests that some methods of sex are safe methods of homosexual sex." The lawsuit says the law stigmatizes LGBT students. Republican state Rep. T.J. Shope sponsored the repeal amendment and called the law "antiquated." Gay legislators celebrated the legislation in emotional, sometimes deeply personal speeches. ___ 12:30 p.m. Arizona lawmakers are expected to begin the process of repealing a 1991 law that bars HIV and AIDS instruction that "promotes a homosexual lifestyle" following the filing of a lawsuit by LGBT groups. Wednesday's planned action in the state House comes a day after Republican Attorney General Mark Brnovich declined to join in defending the suit filed last month against the state's Board of Education and schools chief. The 1991 law also prohibits HIV and AIDS instruction that "portrays homosexuality as a positive alternative lifestyle" or "suggests that some methods of sex are safe methods of homosexual sex." The lawsuit says the law stigmatizes lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students and is discriminatory. . ..

US Congress approves Colorado River drought plan

PHOENIX (AP) - A plan to address a shrinking supply of water on a river that serves 40 million people in the U.S. West is headed to President Donald Trump. The U.S. House and Senate approved the Colorado River drought contingency plan on Monday. Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming spent years negotiating the drought plan. They aim to keep two key reservoirs from falling so low they cannot deliver water or produce hydropower. Mexico has promised to store water in Lake Mead on the Arizona-Nevada border if the U.S. legislation is approved by April 22. State water managers and federal officials have cited a prolonged drought, climate change and increasing demand for the river's flows as reasons to cut back on water usage. The agreement runs through 2026. In the lower basin, Arizona and Nevada would keep water in Lake Mead when it falls to certain levels. The cuts eventually would loop in California if Lake Mead's level drops far enough. The measure approved Monday reflects language proposed by the states but also includes a section that says the implementation of the drought plan won't be exempt from federal environmental laws. The Imperial Irrigation District in California, which holds the largest entitlement to Colorado River water, and environmental groups had raised concern about draft language they took to mean federal laws like the National Environmental Policy Act and the Endangered Species Act would be disregarded.

News of the Day From Across the Nation

1 Baltimore politics: The city council on Monday sent a letter to Mayor Catherine Pugh calling on her to resign as investigators probe lucrative deals she negotiated to sell her children's book series. Bernard Young is the city council president who has temporarily departed the panel to take over Pugh's day-to-day responsibilities. The mayor took an indefinite leave of absence, citing health reasons. In response to the council's letter, Pugh said she "fully intends" to return once her health improves. 2 Mother killed: A man shot and killed the mother of his 17-month-old child during a custody exchange in front of a Southern California police station and was arrested several hours later, authorities said. The child was not injured. The woman was approaching the front door of the Hawthorn Police Department Sunday evening to pick up the child when the father emerged from a parking lot with a shotgun and opened fire, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said in a statement. His identity and the names of the mother and child were not released. 3 Chicago violence: Two men who opened fire on a crowd of people gathered for a baby shower, wounding six people, including two children, may have acted in retaliation for an earlier gang conflict, police said. Authorities have only "shards of information" about what happened at the family gathering in Chicago because witnesses are not cooperating, a police spokesman said. At least a dozen people were gathered outside a home decorated with balloons for the baby shower when two armed men approached on foot and began shooting Saturday evening. The gunmen fired multiple rounds and fled. Three of the victims were hospitalized in critical condition. 4 Trump club: A Monday bond hearing was adjourned until next week...