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ACC teams look to answer questions at quarterback

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) - Dabo Swinney's quarterback situation at Clemson seems settled for a while. Not many of his colleagues around the Atlantic Coast Conference can say the same thing. Ten schools faced questions of varying degrees of urgency at QB this spring. Eight of those schools lost a starter from last year either due to graduation, transfer, early NFL draft declaration or disciplinary issues. So as the league transitions into summer conditioning and with a little over four months until the season starts, only a handful of schools seem to have solidified their QB spots and the ACC's quarterback club shapes up as Tigers star Trevor Lawrence and a bunch of new faces. Duke's Daniel Jones left school a year early to enter the draft and is a potential first-round pick. Virginia Tech's Josh Jackson (Maryland) and North Carolina's Nathan Elliott (Arkansas State) transferred. Deondre Francois was kicked off the Florida State team in February. And among the QBs who exhausted their eligibility are Syracuse's Eric Dungey and North Carolina State's Ryan Finley. The eight departed starters combined to throw for 16,822 yards and 107 touchdowns in 2018 while rushing for 2,402 yards and 40 more scores. For some, the solution seems pretty simple: Duke heir apparent Quentin Harris made two starts last season while Jones was injured, and Ryan Willis started the final 10 games for the Hokies after Jackson's season-ending injury. For others, it's a bit more up in the air: UNC has two redshirt freshmen and a true freshman vying for the job, new Louisville coach Scott Satterfield will likely choose between Jawon Pass and Malik Cunningham, and Miami could turn to Ohio State transfer Tate Martell or stick with N'Kosi Perry. But the ACC certainly won't be bereft of quarterback talent...

For Jay Inslee, a methodical buildup to a long 2020 campaign

TRAVELERS REST, S.C. (AP) - Sit down in New Hampshire for a leading liberal podcast. Tour flood damage in Iowa. Feed some sheep, shoot some hoops, drink local beer in South Carolina. And along the way, hammer home a pledge to combat climate change and "make Donald Trump a blip in history." That's the deliberate, sometimes understated approach for Washington Gov. Jay Inslee as the 2020 Democratic presidential hopeful navigates the shadows of rivals who have bigger crowds, better name identification and heftier campaign accounts. But the 68-year-old Inslee, who boasts decades of electoral success, doesn't apologize for his methodical plan with climate action as his calling card. He insists it's both an existential necessity for the nation and a political necessity for him. "We have the right strategy, which is to identify a unique mission statement first," Inslee told The Associated Press at the conclusion of his recent three-state campaign swing, his first extended trip since his March 1 campaign launch. "We wanted to do that and get that flag firmly planted. We're still planting it." The political calculus is simple enough. Despite more than a decade in Congress and six years in the governor's mansion, Inslee remains a little-known politician from the Pacific Northwest, away from the media glare and donor base of the East Coast. So he needs something more to get attention alongside the likes of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, an icon of the progressive movement; Kamala Harris, a California senator with 40 million constituents; or even another underdog like Pete Buttigieg, the 37-year-old mayor of South Bend, Indiana, who's become a sensation in the early months of the campaign. His policy niche has landed him regular national media appearances, most recently on a New Hampshire taping of Pod Save America, a top...

LGBT donors helping Pete Buttigieg defy 2020 expectations

GREENVILLE, South Carolina (AP) - Jonah Burrell first contributed to Pete Buttigieg's campaign after watching the first prominent openly gay presidential candidate on television. When Burrell later saw him in person in a cramped upstate South Carolina auditorium, he knew he had to do it again. "I felt compelled to help," Burrell, a nursing student who is gay, said after the event. "It makes me proud he's a gay man." Financial support from the LGBT community has helped Buttigieg defy expectations by raking in more than $7 million in just over two months. The money has come from grassroots supporters like Burrell and big-dollar Hollywood donors who hope Buttigieg will make history - or at least the summer debate stage. The Buttigieg appeal was on display again this weekend when the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, and his husband separately headlined galas for two of the country's largest LGBT organizations. And the early haul shows no sign of slowing. Victory Fund, which invested $2 million in LGBT candidates in 2018, expects to endorse Buttigieg shortly after he formally joins the race, President and CEO Annise Parker said. The board that makes endorsements - made up of 100 "bundlers," or people who commit to raising $5,000 annually for candidates - has been "champing at the bit" to endorse him, she said. Once they do, the group will appeal to its donor network to directly support Buttigieg's campaign and promote his events. Of the candidates who've released their first-quarter fundraising totals, Buttigieg outraised New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker and Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, who each brought in over $5 million, and entrepreneur Andrew Yang. Other candidates exceeded his total, including California Sen. Kamala Harris ($12 million) and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders (more than $18 million). But they are...