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Votto hits 1st career leadoff homer in Reds' 4-1 win

SAN DIEGO (AP) - Joey Votto hit his first career leadoff homer and Tucker Barnhart and Jesse Winker also connected for the Cincinnati Reds, who beat the San Diego Padres 4-1 Thursday night to snap a four-game losing streak. The Padres, who had a three-game lead in the NL West on Saturday, have lost four straight for the first time this year and trail the Los Angeles Dodgers by 1 ½ games. Votto, 35 and in his 14th big league season, was batting leadoff for the third straight game and just the fourth time in his career. He drove rookie Chris Paddack's third pitch to right-center, his second. Barnhart, batting ninth while starter Tanner Roark batted eighth, hit a two-run shot to right with two outs in the fifth. The homer was upheld after a video review. Winker homered off Phil Maton with one out in the ninth, his fifth. Roark (1-0) earned his first win in his fourth start. He held the Padres to one run and four hits in 5 1/3 innings, struck out five and walked two. Raisel Iglesias struck out the side in the ninth for his third save. The Padres put runners on first and second with one out in the sixth to chase Roark. Zach Duke came on and struck out Eric Hosmer before Robert Stephenson came on and allowed Manny Machado's ground-rule double. He then struck out Franmil Reyes to end the inning with runners on second and third. Paddack (0-1) allowed three runs and three hits in six innings while striking out five and walking one in his fourth start. He struck out the side in the third, including Votto looking to end the inning. UP NEXT Reds: RHP Anthony DeSclafani (0-1, 7.43) is scheduled to make his fourth start Friday night in the second game of the four-game series. Padres: LHP Matt Strahm (0-2, 4.26) is scheduled to make his fourth start. ___ More AP MLB:...

More charges for man accused of claiming to be missing child

CINCINNATI (AP) - A federal grand jury indictment that was filed Thursday accuses an Ohio man who claimed to be a missing child from Illinois of lying to federal agents and of identity theft. Brian Michael Rini, 23, of Medina, now faces two counts of lying to federal agents and one count of aggravated identity theft. U.S. Attorney Benjamin Glassman's office in Cincinnati said making false statements carries a possible sentence of eight years in prison with conviction, while the identify theft count would bring a mandatory two years if he is convicted. He had been arrested earlier on a single false statement count after DNA testing proved he wasn't Timmothy Pitzen, who disappeared in 2011 at age 6. Rini is being held without bond, with arraignment scheduled Friday. A message seeking comment was left Thursday with his federal public defender. Police picked up Rini the morning of April 3 on the streets of Newport, Kentucky. They said that he told them he was Timmothy and that he had escaped two kidnappers after years of sexual abuse. Police took him to Cincinnati Children's Hospital for treatment and testing. Federal authorities have said they were skeptical, especially after he refused to be fingerprinted, but didn't want to miss a chance to possibly solve the Pitzen disappearance. The FBI said DNA testing established his identity as a convicted felon who had been released on probation in March from an Ohio prison after serving more than a year on burglary and vandalism charges. Federal authorities said he also has twice before portrayed himself to be a juvenile sex trafficking victim, as he did in this case. A federal magistrate last week cited Rini's lack of a permanent address, past mental health issues and "a lengthy criminal history" that goes back to age 13 as...

60 people charged in illegal prescription opioid crackdown

CINCINNATI (AP) - Federal authorities said Wednesday they have charged 60 people, including 31 doctors, for their roles in illegally prescribing and distributing millions of pills containing opioids and other dangerous drugs. U.S. Attorney Benjamin Glassman of Cincinnati described the action as the biggest known takedown yet of drug prescribers. Robert Duncan, U.S. attorney for eastern Kentucky, called the doctors involved "white-coated drug dealers." Authorities said the 60 includes 53 medical professionals tied to some 350,000 prescriptions and 32 million pills. The operation was conducted by the federal Appalachian Regional Prescription Opioid Strike Force, launched last year by the Trump administration. Authorities said arrests were being made and search warrants carried out as they announced the charges at a news conference. They didn't immediately name those being charged. U.S. health authorities have reported there were more than 70,000 drug overdose deaths in 2017, for a rate of 21.7 per 100,000 people. West Virginia and Ohio have regularly been among the states with the highest overdose death rates as the opioid crisis has swelled in recent years. Among those charged was a Tennessee doctor who dubbed himself the "Rock Doc" and is accused of prescribing dangerous combinations of drugs such as fentanyl and oxycodone, sometimes in exchange for sex, authorities said Others include a Kentucky doctor who is accused of writing prescriptions to Facebook friends who came to his home to pick them up, another who allegedly left signed blank prescriptions for staff to fill out and give to patients he hadn't seen, and a Kentucky dentist accused of removing teeth unnecessarily and scheduling unneeded follow-up appointments. A Dayton, Ohio, doctor was accused of running...

Puig llega tarde y se pierde entrega de anillos a ex Dodgers

LOS ÁNGELES (AP) - Yasiel Puig llegó tarde al Dodger Stadium el lunes en su regreso a Los Ángeles por primera vez desde que fue canjeado a los Rojos de Cincinnati. El cubano se perdió la oportunidad de recibir en persona el anillo para los campeones de la Liga Nacional de parte del dueño de los Dodgers, Mark Walter, y otro personal de la directiva del equipo. Los anillos fueron entregados a los expeloteros de Dodgers Matt Kemp, Alex Wood y Kyle Farmer durante un reunión informal afuera del clubhouse de los Rojos. "Sólo estuvimos los seis compartiendo anécdotas, saludando y demás, y nosotros les agradecimos lo que hicieron para ayudarnos a lograr lo que hicimos el año pasado y les deseamos lo mejor", señaló el manager de los Dodgers, Dave Roberts. Roberts fue acompañado por Cuando se le preguntó sobre el hecho de haber llegado tarde a la reunión, Puig respondió: "Puede enviar el anillo a mi casillero o entregármelo durante la práctica de bateo. O me lo puede dar en persona, no me importa". Roberts se rio cuando se le preguntó si se sentía contento de estar en el equipo contrario ahora que el nombre de Puig es mencionado. "Sí, me siento feliz", dijo sonriendo. Roberts afirmó que la relación entre él y Puig "está bien" y que han estado en contacto a través de mensajes de texto y en una llamada telefónica durante la pretemporada. "Este chico hizo mucho por la comunidad y ayudó a los Dodgers a lograr muchas cosas buenas", explicó el entrenador. Puig también se presentó 70 minutos tarde a una conferencia de prensa programada con medios locales. Había enfrentado preguntas en inglés y español por varios minutos cuando el cerrador Kenley Jansen de los Dodgers de pronto apareció detrás de una fila de cámaras de televisión para...

Opinion | Trump Country’s reaction to the Mueller report: ‘So what?’

HILLSBORO, Ohio - It might be expected that the conclusion of the Russia collusion investigation would be greeted in Trump Country with celebration, relief or even a degree of gloating. That's not the case. Here in southern Ohio and, likely, other places where President Donald Trump's support has remained rock solid, the conclusion by special counsel Robert Mueller that neither Trump nor anyone associated with his campaign conspired with Russia during the 2016 election was greeted with a collective shrug. That's because, for Trump Country, the findings represented a foregone conclusion. Apprised that the Mueller report had found no collusion, one woman at a Hillsboro diner on Sunday summed up the feelings of most here when she replied, "So what? We already knew that, didn't we?" Trump's base has long regarded the Mueller investigation as a political exercise springing from the refusal of Trump's opponents to accept his election. They also know that the Mueller report will not be the end of what they see as a string of partisan investigations. They know Democrats, "Never Trumpers" and many in the media will quickly pivot, generating as many future headlines as possible from ongoing state probes and congressional investigations. That beat goes on. Since it won't get repeated as often as it deserves after nearly two years of manufactured suspicion, it's important to note this from Attorney General William Barr's summary of Mueller's probe: "The Special Counsel's investigation did not find that the Trump campaign or anyone associated with it conspired or coordinated with Russia in its efforts to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election." Later, the summary added that such collusion did not happen "despite multiple offers from Russian-affiliated individuals to assist the Trump campaign." Instead of all Americans,...